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Want to comment on our latest interviews?  Give your opinion on a panel topic?  Tell us how awesome we are or where we need to pick up the slack?  Well, now you have a place on ALL PULP for your comments, complaints, theories, and whatnot!   Just post your comments below whatever they may be, as long as they are not personal attacks on individuals, do not contain cursing or inappropriate content of any sort.  Let us know what you like, don't like, would like to see, not see!  Post away at here at ALL PULP COMMENTS!

PLEASE NOTE-
All Pulp's mission is to spread pulp news to the masses.  Overly negative or potentially harmful posts will be be, at the Moderator's discretion, deleted. If you wish to comment to the moderator privately on this policy, feel free to email at allpulp@yahoo.com

317 comments:

  1. Hi Pulpsters,
    I've subscribed to the RSS feed of the homepage, but it only delivers articles that appear there. How about a feed that delivers News, Interviews, Reviews, etc.?

    Thank you for creating and running this site!
    -RK

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  2. Response to Richard-
    Thanks so much for the thanks! And we will get on figuring out how to do an RSS feed on everything else...it may take some time as we are learning as we go, but consider it a priority!

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  3. Hello there. I'm enjoying the site but I think it assumes that all visitors are familiar with the pulp genre.

    How about a section that explains to people new to Pulp, just what makes a story Pulp.

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  4. Hmmm, votemarvel...that sounds like a future feature article to us! Thanks!

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  5. Seconded! Great idea for a feature article!

    This site is my new favorite. Love it to death, people.

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  6. Well, I got my copy of Doc Savage #6 from my LCS. It was worse then I thought after reading the review. Doc's characterization was totally off. And what's with Monk referring to Doc as their employer??? That's not how it is.

    And the Avenger backup was worse then I thought. Jason Starr has NO IDEA what Smitty's background is. He's just making up all this stuff. Its like all he had was a list of the other aides with no idea of who they are.

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  7. Agree with you all the way emb021, DC has no clue how to do pulp comics. Really very sad. Thing I hate is those folks unfamiliar with real pulps are picking up this trash and thinking it is pulp.

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  8. Thanks for the wonderful comments, folks. Please keep 'em coming and tell your friends about All Pulp.

    Bobby

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  9. Just wanted to take a moment to thank everyone involved in creating this site.
    I think that it is great that pulp style stories are making a return and this site is is excellent in helping me keep up to date on what to be looking for.
    Keep up the good work.
    BTW, excellent interview with MR. Reinagel!

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  10. Kathulos, thanks a lot for the compliments and following what we do here! Post any time and make suggestios on what you'd like us to do more of!

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  11. Great site! One suggestion. When you post new content it often refers the reader to a separate section of the website and it takes some searching to find the referenced interview or bit of news in the archives. Any chance you can post that interview or bit of news on the front page blog as well as archiving it?

    I've got All Pulp on feed and it would make it much easier to find the newest posting if it were on the front page.

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  12. On a personal note, its neat to be interviewed for something I'm really into. I've involved with other areas, but no one has every bothered to do that.

    I should point out that I probably overlooked a lot of good pulp publishers out there. Black Dog Books is one I missed, that has several works coming I want.

    I have to agree with the assessment of First Wave #4. I thought Doc putting himself in a position to get captured by the Right Red Hand group was just sloppy. Doc wouldn't do that UNLESS he was planning to be captured, and I didn't get that feel.

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  13. Great review on Sky Captain. I think you enunciated my own issues with the movie. I like it alot, but was left unsatisfied, and couldn't quite figure out why.

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  14. Happy to hear you enjoyed the review, MB! plenty more on the way, I assure you.

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  15. Here are some subjects for future interviews:

    Pulpdom: http://www.pulpdom.com/ moonfire@frontier.net
    Zine of Bronze/Main Enterprises: http://www.mainenterprises.ecrater.com/
    Bronze Gazette: Howard Wright (rrenwick@sbcglobal.net)
    Blood N Thunder: Ed Hulse bnteditor@yahoo.com

    Howard Hopkins (Golden Perils) http://www.howardhopkins.com/
    Black Dog Books: http://www.blackdogbooks.net/
    Pulpville Press: http://www.pulpvillepress.com/
    Adventure House: http://www.adventurehouse.com/
    Dial P for Pulp: http://www.ironmammoth.talktalk.net/dialpforpulp/
    Girasol Collectibles: www.girasolcollectables.com
    Anthony Tollin & Sanctum Books: http://www.shadowsanctum.com/index.html
    Robert Weinberg: http://www.robertweinberg.net/index.html
    Wildside Press: http://www.wildsidebooks.com/
    Hafner Press: http://www.haffnerpress.com/

    James Bama (hey, I can dream)
    is George Gross still alive?
    Peter Caras (artist of first Avenger book covers)

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  16. Thanks, Michael, several of these are on our list and those that weren't, I just added!

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  17. More topic of future articles/interviews

    Illustration Magazine http://www.illustration-magazine.com/

    retrospectives of some of the pulp arts of the past:
    Bamhoufer, Graves Gladney, Blakeslee, Norman Saunders, etc.

    Ed Hamilton (if I have the name) who did great pulp related artwork later on.

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  18. Just finished reading the latest of Barry's excellent DOC SAVAGE reviews. DC is really determined to hang in there with this series, ain't they?

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  19. Also read the review of Doc Savage #7, after reading the comic last night. My big issue is the off characterization of all the characters. Doc is not that fast, and his behavior is so off.

    I wouldn't even give it 1 star.

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  20. Derrick, I think they're going to hang in there for a bit longer. I think it'll last around 20 issues before they throw in the towel. They are saying there will be more First Wave books in the future but given the sales on the ones out now, I just can't see that happening.

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  21. How are the sales on the First Wave titles? I haven't heard much about how they're doing sales wise but they can't be doing that well as I haven't heard anybody say a good word about any of them....well, maybe The Spirit...that seems to be the only First Wave title working for some.

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  22. I looked them up for July 2010:

    First Wave # 3 - 25,920
    Doc Savage # 4 - 14,621
    The Spirit # 4 - 11,915

    So they're not doing too hot.

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  23. MB -- I don't give zeroes, by and large. I rate things on a 1-5 scale. The Doc issue was bad but it wasn't the worst thing I'd ever read, either. And the art on The Avenger is nice... though it's paired with an awful story. Hence the one star.

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  24. I'm sure they're hoping that numbers will pick up when they release the trades. I'm curious to see what happens.

    Bobby

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  25. I AM looking forward to the next Incognito series, tho.

    I prefer seeing Brubakers take on the pulp heroes. Since he's got Jess Nevins doing articles for them, he shows more respect for the source material. And since his characters are pastiches, we have no reason to say he's altering characters.

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  26. When they release the trades I may borrow them from my local library. THE SPIRIT, anyway since everybody seems to agree that it's the best out of all the First Wave titles.

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  27. Darwyn Cooke did a great job on the previous Spirit series. They're collected in 2 trades. Definitely worth reading.

    Bobby

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  28. Wow, I just discovered your site and read it all the way through in a couple sittings! Keep up the great work!

    Your stuff on pulp for young readers made me wonder if you're going to do anything regarding Tim Byrd's Doc Wilde book(s)? The first one was awesome and the next is due sometime soon.

    I'd also love something about F. Paul Wilson's Repairman Jack, and James Rollins and Matthew Reilly, great modern pulpsters.

    A piece on where people can find great old pulp -- like the Doc Savage/Shadow/Avenger books from Sanctum and the Spider books from Girasol -- would likely be hugely helpful to a lot of fans too.

    Thank you.

    John

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  29. Welcome, John. Thanks for the suggestions!

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  30. All Pulp, I'm really enjoying all the great material you keep posting. Have you guys thought about adding a forum to the site?

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  31. Good review on "Remo Williams". While the various numbered men's adventure series (Nick Carter, Executioner, Destroyer, et al) could be considered a sort of 'neo-pulp' of their time, I by and large avoided them. I tried one Nick Carter, and didn't care for it. But somehow in the late 80s I got into Destroyer, maybe because of the science-fictional elements helped, and got a lot of the back 'issues' and was getting the new ones (which, at that time was being written by Will Murray. Not sure if I knew this or this had an effect). But I got out of the series in the early 90s. I *did* get the recent revival, and was disappointed the publisher didn't continue it. Both the fantastical elements and the satire made it an enjoyable series.

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  32. Richard
    Thanks for the compliments! As for a forum, this comments page is as close as we will get for a while.

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  33. Saw your review of the Doc Ardan novel. I actually emailed one of the Lofficiers about it, asking what they changed. As I recall, they mainly tweaked the descriptions of Ardan & Natas to make the pastiche more obvious.

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  34. Thanks, folks, for posting the blurb about and link to my novelette, "Helping Them Take the Old Man Down."

    Bill Preston

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  35. The Cliffhanger fiction is a great idea! I love serialized pulp stories, being excited each week about the heroe's deeds... all that stuff. And begin with The Master of Men, my favourite!

    Two thumbs up. And if i have more thumbs more would be up. From the bottom of my heart, thanks to all who made possible this, really.

    Now to wait next week! :D

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  36. Great second chapter. Mr. Powell gets the character way of act with speed. And the cliffhanger of this part... Just wow. The Crucible don't know it, but he's already dead.

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  37. Thanks for spreading the word on my interviews. Much appreciated.

    Bobby

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  38. Deka, thanks for reading CLIFFHANGER FICTION..and Bobby...you're welcome, man...we wish more people would keep us updated on their travels, so to speak, we'd post them too!

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  39. Nah, thanks to you for the idea of publish it here ;)

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  40. Sounds like a challenge. Send us your press releases, pulpsters.

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  41. hello another week! This episode of City of Melting Death is just great. I can see, hear, the characters. Even smell the perfume Nita use. Mr. Powell is a great storyteller. The last paragraph is amazing.

    Iknow i sound a bit fanboy, but sincerely, is the most hooking story i ever read in along time. Hope after this you continue with the Cliffhanger Fiction ;)

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  42. Congratulations to Ric and Art for winning The Echoes Award. Greatly deserved.

    Bobby

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  43. Dear All Pulp:
    Mister Hancock asked for suggestions, so here's mine.
    While it's nice to know what the already established (Moonstone, Airship 27, etc.) are doing, I have not seen too many posts in regards to the new kid(s) on the block. Surely if there is a pulp revival in progress, there has to be some new players in the field too. Why not give the newer publishers and creative people a chance to shine in your spotlights?

    L. Knight

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  44. L,
    This is Tommy (Hancock). Thanks so much for the comment and we would absolutely LOVE to cover more new kids, as you put it. I think we've done okay at that, if you look back over our whole history (Pro Se Productions comes to mind as well as a handful of others)...but I agree completely that we need MORE OF THE NEW GUYS...that was one reason for the letter that you responded to. As much as we want to, THE SPECTACLED SEVEN can't crawl the web and pick up every single source out there, so if you are a new publisher, writer, artist, etc. and you want some attention, let us know asap!! email at allpulp@yahoo.com or post a comment here! And if you are a fan of someone who's not one of the 'biggies', then please get me the contact info and we'll go after 'em like a lost idol in an unspecified jungle!!

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  45. L. Knight,

    What Mr. Hancock said. If there's a publisher or writer or artist or creative person in the field of Pulp you feel has not gotten their time in the spotlight, by all means, let us know and we'll get in touch with them.

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  46. To Tommy and Kalilee Hancock:
    I most wholeheartly and sincerely agree with your review of "The Wizard of Oz".
    That this eternal classic has withstood the test of time even after all these decades is a testament to the talents of the movie's cast and crew as well as L. Frank Baum's literary creation.
    Why Hollywood, in its 'infinite wisdom', would even consider remaking this movie is totally beyond my comprehension.
    As it says in the opening, "To the young and the young at heart". May this film withstand all that might challenge it now and forever.
    Sincerely,
    Lee Houston, Junior

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  47. To the gentlemen who suggested we cover the so called "new kids on the block." It should be crystal clear to anyone following this site that we try to do that to the best of our abilities and every time someone gives us a lead to a new pulp site, company whatever...we do follow up on it. But alas, the web is a very big field and the seven of us alone can't cover all of it. So if any reader here knows of a pulp subject or company we haven't covered, please...don't complain about it. Give us a holler and politely point us in the right direction. We'll do the rest.

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  48. To Martin Powell: Great ending to a very hooking story. The end is sad, bloody and bitter, as it should be. And the final surprise, very well done.

    You truly have understand the Master of Men.

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  49. Do you know of pulp publishers accepting original stories?

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  50. Dear Folks,

    Ron's review of DOC WILDE AND THE FROGS OF DOOM was just fine, but I feel compelled to point out that Phillip Jose Farmer postulated that Doc Savage's "real" surname was Wildman, not Wilde. FROGS OF DOOM is not a continuation of Farmer's Wold Newton mythos... although, I do have to say, such official continuations, fully blessed and authorized by Mr. Farmer, including a novel with a lead protagonist who *does* have the surname Wildman, *do* exist.

    Best regards,
    -Win
    co-author, THE EVIL IN PEMBERLEY HOUSE

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  51. To Kaleb-Yes, there are several that will take stories. I will speak for my own company, PRO SE PRODUCTIONS, looking for original stories for our three mags and our future anthologies..but other companies, AIRSHIP 27, AGE OF ADVENTURE, and tons others that you can find on here by going through our archives are also venues...plenty of pulp!

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  52. Thanks! I've got plenty that I can use to write nearly whatever is needed, so I just need to polish, polish, and polish some more.

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  53. Here's something interesting for all pulp fans:
    According to the Sci-Fi Channel via a 1945 issue of Life magazine, the Nazis were theorizing the possiblity of their own 'death ray'!
    You can read the Sci-Fi post here: http://blastr.com/2010/12/nazi-scientists-were-working-on-an-orbital-death-ray.php and I'm sure some dilligent research can track down the original article.

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  54. A nazi death ray, that's so pulp!

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  55. Ian Watson's Robin Hood was one of my favorites this past year! Thanks for posting that great interview with him!

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  56. In my upcoming Lance Star: Sky Ranger novel, "Coldd Snap!" the Nazis are building a freeze ray. hmmm...

    Bobby

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  57. Domino Lady... my first contact with her is with this cliffhanger Fiction. I'll wait to read the entire story before say something. But can say this: Sexiest heroine i've seen in my life.

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  58. If you like this story, Deka, you'll probably enjoy the anthology series too. It's filled with some fantastic fiction.

    Bobby

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  59. "Plumbers fix pipes and don’t stop for plumber’s block. Race car drivers drive fast in a oval and don’t pull off to the side with driver’s block. Assembly line workers assemble and don’t let assembly block slow them down. You are what you do, not what you claim to do. Writers write. It’s that simple. Don’t give me that writer’s block excuse. Write something. Anything. Then keep writing."

    Thank you for that, Sean. Every aspiring writer should print that out and put it up where he or she can see it every time they sit down to write.

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  60. Reading all this Wold Newton goodness makes me want to get in on the fun my own self.

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  61. First: Thanks. Second: I'm gonna spend more than three days to enjoy as it should be all the stuff about Philip José Farmer. Third: Thanks again ;D

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  62. Bobby, i'm sure. I love short stories and anthologies. My opinion is what are a form very important in the development of prose, and american literature in particular. (genre and mainstream)

    The problem? The money, as always. But i don't lose hope.

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  63. The Wold Newton stuff has been great.

    Finally got info on what JT Edson had done. I had long heard hints, but never being a western fan, I couldn't find details as to how he used it. Some things I read gave the impression he had Doc Savage & co. characters in his works, which didn't seem quite right.

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  64. I am very familiar with that problem, Deka.

    Bobby

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  65. Great interview with Ali. So good to get to know the guy behind the smoke and mirrors who makes us look SO darn good at press time! I about fell off my chair cheering with the comment about Shakespeare being a genesis pulp writer; I've been saying that for years. Yep, pulp is everywhere you look, because it is essentially the heartbeat of a people desperate for heroes and these days it speaks out from every media.

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  66. Thanks to Mr. Eckert to clear some doubts. The Wold Newton family is something so big that makes me feel dizzy when i think about it. This makes me think what i only read one of the few works of PJF translated in Spain: The Riverworld saga.

    Anyway. The text about the Farmerian Holmes makes me ask one question: I know there is a novel making clash Holmes and Fu-Manchu. Is in the Wold Newton canon or not?

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  67. Domino Lady is... well, this was my forst contact with the character, so i can't say how was compared to the original stories.

    But i can say this: Is a character i would like to meet in person.

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  68. Hi guys. Love this site and , wanting to be part of it, I wanted to direct your attention to my pulp influenced webcomic, Lovecraft is Missing, at lovecraftismissing.com. There are 118 pages up thus far and that's only about half the story arc. Hope you'll give it a look and a mention. Best to you all in the new year.
    Larry Latham

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  69. @Deka Black: Hello, I'm glad you enjoyed all the Wold Newton Days articles and interviews. To answer your question, there have been several Sherlock Holmes/Fu Manchu crossovers. The most prominent of these is Cay Van Ash's authorized Fu Manchu novel, TEN YEARS BEYOND BAKER STREET, and yes, in my opinion it takes place in the Wold Newton Universe. There were also two Holmes/Fu Manchu short stories written by George Alec Effinger, "The Musgrave Version," and "The Adventure of the Celestial Snows." These were not authorized by the Fu Manchu rights holders (to my knowledge).

    There is a lot of information about these stories, and many more Wold Newton crossovers, in my two-volume CROSSOVERS: A SECRET CHRONOLOGY OF THE WORLD, available now from Black Coat Press and Amazon.com

    http://www.blackcoatpress.com/crossovers.htm

    Thanks for your interest, and all the best,

    -Win

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  70. Thanks! And yes, i was asking about the Van Ash book.

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  71. Taking a moment to wish all those who make All Pulp possible a Merry Christmas and Happy Holidays. Also, looking forward to seeing what 2011 brings to the fans of Pulpdom. Whatever it is, All Pulp, will be there to keep us informed. Keep up the excellent work!

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  72. "There were also two Holmes/Fu Manchu short stories written by George Alec Effinger, "The Musgrave Version," and "The Adventure of the Celestial Snows." These were not authorized by the Fu Manchu rights holders (to my knowledge)."

    As I recall, these weren't so much short stories, but excerpts from a planned novel. I don't know how much was written before GAE died, and I think he didn't get permission from the Fu Manchu rights holders, which delayed the writing/release of the novel.

    Too bad, because I really enjoyed them and after reading the first, looked for info on the promised novel.

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  73. Before I say anything, due to a necessary increase in security protocol, I have changed my name.

    The article on the Nicholas Saint idea, that's a brilliant idea. You might not write it, but it is one of those ideas that are worth tinkering with.

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  74. Great to know Return of the Originals is available. But i have a doubt: Why The Spider don't make a appareance in this story?

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  75. OK, I gotta catch up! To Larry, Gerald, and Bobby...Best Holiday wishes to you all too!

    To Varon-Thanks for the comments on Nicholas Saint..he is definitely one I will tinker with, but again, he's on IDEAS LIKE BULLETS..so if anyone wants to co-tinker with me, they can holler at me...

    Deka-On the MOONSTONE MONDAY press release about the release of RETURN OF THE ORIGINALS, if you'll look at the information about the hardcover copy, you'll note it mentions a story exclusive to the hardcover of how just how The Spider figures into the story!

    Tommy

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  76. Oops, thanks for the reminder Tommy, i forgot, sorry!

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  77. Happy New year to all of you i Allpulp! And a wish to this year: More hero pulp in the style of The Spider and Black Bat! ;)

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  78. As a new year begins I want to extend my personal thanks and appreciation to everyone who has made my association with ALL PULP such a wonderful and exciting experience. I'm looking forward to great things from the world of pulp in 2011 and I'm proud to be a part of ALL PULP which has in such a short time established itself as a major source of information as well as entertainment about everything pulp!

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  79. Hey Ron. Enjoyed your review of The Khan Dynasty. I have both that and More Than Mortal. Now I'm debating which to read first. Suggestions?

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  80. I have a questioni believe you can answer: Moonstone have plans to release a second The Spider anthology?

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  81. Your Pulp Panel topic has touched on my own dilemma. While I think the characters are long overdue for a feature of their own and would love to see Kato thumping bad guys in 3D, I'm reluctant to waste a big chunk of change to watch a formulaic special effects extravaganza conceived by a bunch of beancounters and their yes-man director who have no respect or understanding of the source material or characters. I will probably wait for it to come to Redbox and watch it then with my 3-year-old.

    I might could handle it being a comedy, but from what I've seen so far, they've written the title character as a pathetic loser. I'm all for emphasizing what a badass Kato is, and for demonstrating he has brains as well as martial arts skills. But at the expense of making Britt Reid/the Green Hornet a hapless boob? Hey Hollywood: Your cognitive/creative limitations are showing again!

    Here's a clip that demonstrates a creative effort respecting the characters: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Rjm53J1G4M

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  82. Creepy and scary start for Death Angel. My type of pulp hero, being honest.

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  83. Please, remember me to not mess with Death Angel.

    I like it. Mr. Bullock makes te modus operandi of the Death Angel clear and unique. Cold, mercyless justice. Ifyou are a evildoer of any kind,and crosspaths with Death Angel... you're hopeless.

    I like the Cliffhanger Fiction. A lot. Andthe serial format to publish it. Please,continue with it.

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  84. Thanks for Fang and Sting. A very nice detail ^^

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  85. @Deka Black: Thank you kindly, sir. :-)

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  86. Thanks to you for write the story ;)

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  87. Hello, I know this is late to the party, but I would like to offer my compliments and congratulations for a lucid and well thought out rebuttal to my writings, in your December 13, 2010, post. For the record, allow me to apologize for any hurt feelings or offense. Sadly, I am a rough hewn man, and where I came from, it was all fun and games when someone lost an eye. I am often far more bruising than I mean to be, and certainly more than I need to be. In my defense, I will say that I am not nearly so malicious as I occasionally might seem. And I can avoid being combative, if I manage to catch myself.

    As for Wold Newtonry, I confess to a long running ambiguity, a love hate thing. On the one hand, I find the underlying concepts the tools of it, big, beautiful and bold. It's just cool. On the other hand, some of it drives me up the wall with the choices made, the ideas advanced. These are honest reactions, and I won't varnish them.

    For better or worse, I do consider Wold Newtonism to be an architectural, hell even a geological landmark on the fan/lit landscape. It's just so big, so overwhelming conceptually, that its hard to simply ignore or overlook. Sadly, this forces me to try and come to grips with it, and sometimes that doesn't turn out well.

    Regardless, I have great respect for the individuals who play in this field. My comments should never be taken as a personal attack. Those who feel that way are asked to step back and reconsider, or perhaps just send me an email full of obscenities and get it out of their system.

    peace

    Den Valdron

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  88. In response to Hank Brown's comment on the Green Hornet, I'd offer a more nuanced perspective.

    Superficially, and rather obviously 'Brit Reed's character is an offensively callow man child. But with all due respect to Rogen, I'm inclined to give it a bit more credit and a bit more depth.

    I think that there's an underlying story in the Green Hornet, about Brit Reid 'becoming a man.' In childhood we see an angry and unloved child with a stern and remote father. The adult 'party boy' Reid, is almost irredeemablyl shallow. It's clear that he's rebelled against his father by refusing to grow up.

    But this Reid, as selfish and thuggish as he is, is not without qualities. After his father dies, he calls in Kato, and an interesting thing happens. He's not completely selfish, he bonds, he's asking Kato about his life, his opinions.

    The really interesting thing is that Reid and Kato bond, and its handled with relative subtlty. They find common ground in their mutual dislike, their ambiguous relationship to Reid's father, a father figure to both of them. At times, their bonding is distinctly homoerotic, something that the script plays with again and again. But the real bonding is one of brotherhood.

    And why do they bond? Because in a sense, they're both flawed personalities. Brit is a partyboy, selfish, self centred, outgoing and extroverted, creature of pure id and appetite. But Brit lives, he has an appetite for life. He has desires and drives.

    Kato, superficially, is far superior. But think a bit. You have someone with Kato's astonishing skills as a designer, a martial artist, a mechanic and technician... and he's been content to spend his life as a lousy chauffeur? Come on. With a bit of ambition, Kato could be Tony Stark. Why isn't he? Kato in the movie represents a superego to Brit's id. He's logical, incredibly competent, almost superhuman, but somehow has no drive, no purpose.

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  89. And this is where they bond. Brit recognizes something astonishing in Kato, and when he can step out of his selfishness repeatedly tells Kato 'never make coffee again.' Kato finds freedom in Brit, for once he's got motivation, he's got goals and purposes, stupid and childish as they may be. Kato's been drifting through life, and Brit comes in and gives him purpose, ambitions, challenges.

    This is way too smart for a Seth Rogen movie, but its definitely there. Most of the movie is about these two men growing together.

    Both of them, as we watch, step up their game. Rogen as a playboy, shows suprising backbone in interrupting a mugging, and later in that fight shocks himself and everyone else by being able to throw a mean punch. In each of the following action sequences, Rogen's Brit keeps stepping up his game, getting better, tougher, faster. It's not an overnight thing, but its there, he's getting better. And along the way, he becomes more mature, occasionally, perhaps often losing out to his immature impulses, but also transcending them. He's not always the idiot everyone takes him for.

    Let's face it, the Brit Reid from the beginning of the movie would not have been able to hold his own against Kato in their fight scene (acknowledging that Kato is holding back). Instead, Brit's got the heart to take a pretty bad beating, refusing to give in, and actually gets some of his own shots in. It's taken the entire movie up to that point to get Brit to the level where he can have that fight.

    Kato also grows, more subtly, but its there. He becomes more his own man. He becomes less and less willing to be in Brit's shadow, to be in anyone's shadow. He's spent his life as a passive quiet nonentity, and he's coming out of that shell. We see this happening in two ways - one is his interest and chemistry with the girl Lenore, and the other is his resentment of Brit's selfishness. (Which means that the script demands that Brit keep expressing obnoxious selfishness in order for us to see Kato growing assertive).

    For Kato, a key scene is where he almost punches Brit's head off at their offices when Brit tells him to make coffee. This relates back to Brit's early line "don't ever make coffee for anyone again, you're better than that."

    Anyway, I've gone on to long. It's hardly a perfect movie. But there's a lot more going on with it than may be apparent on the surface. I'd say, give it a chance.

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  90. The Phamtom! The Ghost who walks!Tanks, really, many many thanks! I have so many memories of this hero.. You made a fan happy again ^^

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  91. Great review of The Spider adventure. The idea behind the tobacco is good. And evenmore good is the explanation to is, modern readers.

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  92. Thank you kindly for the Pretty Sinister Books plug! I was very happy when my blog was welcomed so enthusiastically in the crime fiction world thanks to a plug by Steve Lewis.

    And now I get a hearty welcome from the pulp world. A feed from my first page, no less! I guess this means I have to get cracking on my planned post on G. T. Fleming-Roberts. He's the first pulp writer I planned to do an article on. He's always been a favorite due to his penchant for the bizarre. Look for it soon!

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  93. John,
    You're welcome...and our pulp brush is pretty broad as is the definition of things that qualify....Carr was perfect!:).....but yes, please bring on Fleming-Roberts and more!

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  94. The Audiocomics stuff looks great. Audio drama is a new thing for me, a love at first look, you can say. But this Green lama image seems more a green Supermanthan a master of the mystic arts.

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  95. Thanks for the advert of techniocal diffcultiers on Cliffhanger Fiction.

    And other thing: the Chicks with capes anthology... i dare to say is a must read to some jerks i know saying women don't know how to write superpowered/masked stories. They can, and very well!

    (Then you say them who is Leigh Brackett.)

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  96. Hi there - thanks for the kind review of my PMP Fiction Blog. It was much appreciated!

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  97. Well, well,,, another very nice tale of a beloved character. Thanks! ^^ (i'm talking about the Phantom)

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  98. Readed the review for The Spider #1 Nita Kidnapped? And the evildoers want to turn her into a zombie? They're dead from the beginning!

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  99. MOONSTONE CLIFFHANGER FICTION:

    So far I've enjoyed most of these short stories. Though I would love to see more of Death Angle

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  100. Old-school PI action. But what i like more is the transition scenes marked with the parts of the expense account of Johnny Dollar. is a good detail i love, it gives charm to the story and the character.

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  101. The collection of pulps... I really hope it find a good caretaker. Really good.

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  102. Hi again! As i said in a earlier comment, old-school classic PI action. Fast, to the point without digress, and changing scenes with the expenses account of Mr. Dollar is a nice good detail.

    I liked it and is a nice change from what i read often. Two thumbs up!

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  103. Hi again. I feel like i am monopolizing the comments section...

    Anyway, i want to say two things:

    1-Congrats to Gregg Taylor for his award!

    2-Vampires! TRUE vampires! Thanks ^^ I'm more a werewolves man, but this is good to. Really, tahnks. I wa sin need of something to make better my day (minor health issues)

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  104. Congratulations to all of the Pulp Ark Award winners.

    Bobby

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  105. Deka,

    Comment away all you wish and as much as you wish. That's what this section is here for.

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  106. Deka, do as Derrick says...that is what it is for..and if you like Vampires and Werewolves so much, go back and look for my latest IDEAS LIKE BULLETS column...I posted a whole story there..BALANCE, BEASTLY AND BLOODY that has both vampires and werewolves...would love to know your thoughts on it...

    Tommy

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  107. Thanks Dl and Tommy. I will do!

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  108. I just received word I've been nominated for a Munsey award.

    Huh. Go figger.

    www.MarkEllisInk.com

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  109. Really good start of the week for me: I came here and what i find? A peek at the first issue of the Spider! :D

    I must recognize with all, my mental image of Kirkpatrick is a bit different, but his looks here are good. And i'm pretty sure Nita will behave properly. I mean is a very, very though woman.

    I only miss Apollo ;)

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  110. Nice review of the Khan Dynasty. I'm gonna have to pick that one up--sounds like a pulpy Gone With the Wind indeed.

    Hank Brown

    http://twofistedblogger.blogspot.com

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  111. Ah, first meeting of van Helsing and dracula. nice peek at the background of the famous researcher of the unearthly.

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  112. Thanks for the reminder on the Masked Ghost. Just finished Empire of Doom. And i was searching for something nice to read. I will give it a try ;)

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  113. How do I get to meet Lady Action?

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  114. What? What? WHAT??? A Werewolves graphic novel who mention El Cid? I'm from Spain! This is GREAT! :D You have no idea how happy i'mto see someone using him as background.

    In fact, i live in Burgos, the province where is the natal town of Rodrigo Diaz de Vivar. is sad here in his own homeland a character like El Cid is despised due to some political issues :(

    Why is sad? Because is a great character to adventure stories.

    So... from Spain, a thousand thanks to John Chadwell and Duncan Long for using it at least as background for his story!

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  115. I used to love the El Cid stories in those old B&W Warren magazines back in the 70's. I think it was EERIE those stories appeared in.

    Might be worth devoting some time to exploring the history behind that wealth of pulp influenced stories that inhabited the Warren magazines of the 60's and 70's.

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  116. Wow! I didn't know about the EERIE stories. Great to know. The only oter source of El Cid stories i know is two: el "Cantar de Mio Cid" http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cantar_de_mio_cid

    And a book with El Cid living pulp-stle sword & sorcery adventures in his youth, writed by a spanish autor, "Espadas Rojas de Castilla" (Red Swords of Castile).

    I'llsearch for the EERIE stories. Is good to know a historic character (for those who doubt: yes, he was a real person) being portrayed in adventurous deeds!

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  117. A entire tale! This is.. well, great!

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  118. Mr. Powell, this is a contest that seems inspired by the Master of Men himself!

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  119. The two last books mentioned makes me ask a question for documentaton purposes: Is out there any book about weapons of the 1920's?

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  120. More superhero prose! :D (my lateest comment was for another post here)

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  121. This is simply amazing ^^ I have to startsomething pulp related or my mind don't rest.

    I'm talkin about Masked Ghost.

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  122. Do you want to hear? Fine. from where i start¿

    First of all: Reviews,art... all is good. And as an non-english speaker (i'm from Spain) i must say i learned more english from pulp than in my high school classes

    About stuff... Maybe would be a good idea to talk a bit about the story itself of publishing houses. My two favorite feeatures? Interviews and the Cliffhanger Fiction.

    Stuff i don't like? I always forgot to listen the Book cave! And the last days, seeing all this stiff about "Chicks with capes"... i would like to see more about women in pulp: characters and writers.

    That's all... for the moment.

    And of course: a BIG thanks from Spain to all of you. Maybe someday i will bother you with spanish pulp

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  123. Black Bat... I just come across a scan of the 20th novel of Black Bat. Why i tell you this? because thanks to you i come to meet The Spider and many other pulp heroes!

    And about the interview... What is said is a very true fact, and many modern writers taking on pulp characters of the Golden Age must have inmind: What was "R" in those days, is "PG" now.

    P.S.: I'm starting to think i'm sort of possesed by the epistolar madness of Lovecraft... Last 10 comments (11 with this one) are mine! In a row.

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  124. Great article about the Rook, Barry.

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  125. i hope the group help you in your pulp goals ^^ All i can do is chher you ;)

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  126. Those all amazing books and i'm very poor at this moment :( i really hope all of you enjoy them . Envy doesn't suit me. I'm more of the "at least some people out there enjoy this!" type of man.

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  127. C.! My comment dissapeared, well, let's see if i camn remember:

    I missed the last panel. And is about a topic i really love: Pulp heores. If i can say it now, to me a pulp hero is 1-Larger than life 2-A good person but not a fool 3-with a very personal and strong sense of justice. That's the essential, the details can change and do it from one to another (is not the same Phantom Detective or the Spider, for use an example)

    BTW, really good article on "What is pulp". If i can add something, i will say that pulp is culture for one single reason: Popular manifestations are the most remembered by the everyday people, and, in my opinion, the ones who help to build the foundations of the culture itself. Is something we can access and share easily.

    And, of course, is fun and relieving. This is good too! ;)

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  128. Deka, thanks as always for your comments! I'll add you to the panel later! As for the pulp article, thanks, but the focus of the article was about Pulp being literature, not culture..that is a discussion coming soon, though:)

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  129. You're welcome ^^ And emm well, i save this story for the future, then, but have to do with my mother readng Red Harvest.

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  130. Yai! Superhero prose! :D H call me annoying if you want, but i save this for tomorrow Tuesday. Right now i have to go to bed (u wake early in the morning), but i primise a coment about mischief as soon as i finish reading it. OK? ;)

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  131. First: Sorry for the ortography. Second. Finished the story. Give my best congratulations to Elaine Lee.Great story. And about the plot itself: Theo is a jerk.

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  132. The Family Mistery is a awesome idea! A nice twist in the Heroic Dinasty thing.

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  133. Have fun at Windy City, pulpsters. Wish I could be there with you.

    Bobby

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  134. Congratulations to Adam L. Garcia for Green Lama Unbound!

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  135. Joe Gentile being guarded by the Master of men himself! Great pics. I love all ofd them. Some of you seem pretty tired, for good reasons, i think.

    You make me jealous for not being there. And happy for those able to attend ^^

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  136. Woow! Thanks for the videos! ^^ And for remind me of the Masked Ghost. Iam currently at chapter 11. An reading one chapter each day.

    As a BIG fan of serialized fiction, i wish to thanks Kevin Paul for his work from the bottom of my heart. He mad eme realize there is still hope for fans of old-style prose serials.

    And i must add one aspect very important to me. English is not my birth language (i'm from Spain). But Kevin Paul write in a way very easy to understand. So easy in fact, sometimes i forgot in what language i'm reading the story.

    So... if he reads this comment: Mr. Paul, you rock! i hope you make more serialized stories in the future like Revenge of the Masked Ghost.

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  137. Deka,
    Thank you for your kind words regarding REVENGE OF THE MASKED GHOST.I do hope to do further series in the future. There's about eight more chapters of the Masked Ghost. Thank you for following and sticking with it. Be sure to also follow the web comic FLYING GLORY AND THE HOUNDS OF GLORY: www.flying-glory.com
    Best,
    Kevin Paul Shaw Broden

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  138. You're welcome Kevin.I'll follow the webcomic, for sure

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  139. Wow, Mr. Hancock In fact i don't know what to say. Only... well, is good to search a identity of our own. Ionlu can add that i hope people understand that Modern Pulp is related to the Pulp of old. That inthe end is the same, ut have his own identity, too.

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  140. Mr. Hancock,
    You're rallying call for New Pulp was quite stirring and inspirational, especially considering a few of my latest projects.

    I'll make sure to follow the development of New Pulp as much as I can.

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  141. Read the article about Dillon and the work of Derrick Ferguson. The best compliment i can say is i hope some day his work is published here in Spain ;)

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  142. True indeed the article. Pulp IS history.

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  143. The Spider volume 19... and i have no money :( Well, patience. but if you like Hero Pulp, you must read The Spider!

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  144. The review of Viktoriana makes me remember when i fin something annoying in wirdsmiths i like. Bothing serious, but something like a itching feeling.

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  145. I'll say it this way: If i have teleportation powers, i'll use it to go to Pulp Ark. really hope you all a really good time in all senses. And, to those of us who can't go... please, a couple of videos of pics would be very nice.

    One more thing: Must say Mr. Derrick Ferguson is... well, wish i had his muscles! ;)

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  146. Deka: Check out the Pulpwork Press site for a buncha pictures I took and posted on Saturday. In addition, I videoed the Pulp Ark Awards ceremony and once I get back home to Brooklyn, that will be available for you good folks to see.

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  147. The New Classic Pulp and the Superhero Pulp panel must've been really interesting. The second one... superhero prose. I believe is a new frontier to explore. . Sadly, here in Spain, i remember only two books of superhero prose: One form a spanish writer ("Mundo de Dioses") and other from an american one, (Soon I Will Be Invincible).

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  148. The superhero prose panel was incredible, Deka. We had a blast talking about what makes a hero a super hero and compared super hero pulps to super hero comic books. The Book Cave recorded the panel. It should be available soon.

    Bobby

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  149. :D Thanks for the recording then ^^

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  150. Reading the review of Ghost of war.. "steampulp" is a word i like indeed. keep using it! ;)

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  151. Hmmm More masked Ghost goodness. ideal for a saturday morning like this!

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  152. more the Spider. This only can mean danger, but.. is the master of men. Btw: great idea the magazine ;)

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  153. Nice video indeed. Could be a Special Award to the Most Pulpy Speech"

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  154. Rex Riders. Cowboys and Dinosaurs. I need nothing more to know i need to read it.

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  155. Interviews, and a really good book trailer. maked me want stand up and salute!

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  156. In a way, a Shadow movie is more "shadowy" in B&W. And i enjoyed the movie, too.

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  157. Funniest article i've read in a long time ;) You made smile a man in need of it, really.

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  158. You all are starting to make me want to create my own pulp stories. And don't know if is good or not. i mean... i'm very afraid of do it. In the other hand is a wish to show here in Europe we also can do our own heroes.

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  159. YES!!! The Spider vs. the Werewolf! This will be great! The Master of Men against the Moon Menace (carried away). Must say i think the duels are pretty well slected.But i think Phantom Detective would make a better duel facing Victor Frankenstein himself and not the Creature.

    Is only my opinion, of course. in any case. i'm happy to see this duels ^^ Thiskind of enciunters are one of the pulpiest things you can see in any place.

    Thanks agan to the Moonstone staff ;)

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  160. Nice column indeed. Just what i needed to finish this night ;)

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  161. Damballa seems a really courageous hero. And the basis of the plot is just awesome. I'll show this to a indvidual i know who says pukp can't talk about serious bussiness.

    Thanks for creating him!

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  162. Just read the last episode of Revenge of the Masked Ghost. The cliffhanger at the end is so classic that it hurts. In a very good sense. What i want to say is that Mr. Broden knows how to end every chapter of his serial to make us want know more. Don't know the other readers. But me, i'll stay reading until the end of the story.

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  163. I return from some stuf and what i fnd? Interview (great one, so many pulp to enjoy, so little time...) and a new podcast. Podcast i'm downloading right now and enjoy as soon the download is fiished.

    Podcast in some way is very pulp.imean: is radio! And i love radio. is like a girlfriend you can go out anywhere, anytime.

    Plus, will be nice to know how sound the voices of the authors ;)

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  164. The Shadow may know what evil lurks in the hearts of men, but doesn't know how much i enjoy this blog ;)

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  165. Flash Gordon... Never read any of the comcis. And only saw the 1980's movie (btw, the hawkmen were great!). But even with only that, i can say, any story with a scientist called "Hans Zarkov" building a spaceship is a story iwant to watch!

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  166. Derrick:
    I totally agree with you about serials in general and Flash Gordon specifically. While special effects may have improved over the years, no one has yet to beat Buster Crabbe in the title role.
    No matter what role him, Kirk Allyn, and a few other notable performers were in, you could always count on them to save the day no matter how dire the situation was.
    Lee Houston, Junior

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  167. Great, another Pulped Monday Night for me ^^

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  168. Deka: I've got a review of the 1980's FLASH GORDON coming up soon so be on the lookout for that.

    Lee: Buster Crabbe was great, wasn't he? And he still looked as heroic as ever when he appeared as "Commander Gordon" in a episode of the BUCK ROGERS TV show.

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  169. Thanks for the warning about your review ;;)

    For the "New Pulp classics" how about The Rook, for example?

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  170. NEW PULP CLASSICS

    Okay, here goes:

    NOVELS (in no particular order)

    Green Lama Unbound by Adam Garcia

    Spade and Archer by Joe Gores

    Captain Hazzard and the Python Men of the Lost City by Ron Fortier and Chester Hawks

    Unit 13 by Calvin Daniels and Tyrell Tinnin

    Money Shot by Christa Faust

    Dead Street by Mickey Spillane/Max Allan Collins

    ANTHOLOGIES:

    Sherlock Holmes Consulting Detective Volume One (3-time Pulp Factory Award winner)

    Episodes From The Zero Hour Volume One by Jason Butkowski

    I'm sure I can think of plenty more. But this is a start.

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  171. Plametary Stpries... should read more of it. The diamond Ville Dolls from Pulp Spirit,fior example

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  172. New Pulp Classics?

    The Rook series.

    Captain Hazzard by Chester Hawks & Ron Fortier

    Sun Koh by Art Sippo

    Prof. Stone by Wayne Skiver

    works by Wayne Reinagel

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  173. Another New Pulp Classic: Revenge of the masked Ghost, by Kevin Paul Shaw broden. Why i choose this?

    1-Pulp hero themed

    2-Serialized format. And serialized fiction es very pulp.

    3-Plot-based. (i'm not sure if i'm using english correctly here)

    OK, is published in a blog (http://revengeofthemaskedghost.blogspot.com). But ypou know what? that's not important. the story is good, with a feeling very intense of danger and who is the hero, who the evildoer, good use of cliffhangers at the end of many chapters...

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  174. Another New Pulp Classic: The entire DIRE PLANET series written by Joel Jenkins. The best Edgar Rice Burroughs stories never written by Edgar Rice Burroughs

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  175. Barry: Haven't read "Army of the Dead" for myself yet, but do agree with you about how good the McGregor Indiana Jones books are.

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  176. Hi, all,

    I'm electronically self-publishing a new series called The Impostor. It's either my attempt at creating a modern hero pulp or a superhero comic in prose, depending on one's frame of reference. A free preview for all e-reader platforms is available here:

    https://www.smashwords.com/profile/view/rleebyers

    I hope everyone will check it out.

    Best,

    Richard Lee Byers

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  177. The John Carter of Mars trailer... looks good. In fact, i have only one complain: The look of the green martian seen in the trailer. What? really, what? I hope he's not tars tharkas. seriously. I had the idea of Green Barsoomians being more wide, you can say, more muscle, and the fangs, please... They looks like the trolls of Warcraft in green! If my memory is right, the fangs do not grow like that. Big? yes,, of course. But not like an elephant.

    And the Revenge of the Masked Host final chapter. Really nice epilogue to a story i am very happy to have discovered thanks to All Pulp.

    Hope to see and discover more like that here.

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  178. The John Carter Trailer: It looks incredible, but honestly I don't know what the f*** it is, because it is NOT Edgar Rice Burroughs' A Princess of Mars. Color me disappointed.

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  179. Good luck with Paria and the Purple Prince!

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  180. Good sword & planet. *sigh* So many good books. So little... no,not time. Money!

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  181. Free and Superhero prose? Hmmm why not? I'll get right away!

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  182. A guy called "stratosphere" can't beother thing different than a hero.

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  183. Good luck in this next step of New Pulp! ;D

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  184. Cronologies... To me, one of the most fun stuff in this world. Both about real stuff and fictional one.

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  185. Is possible? A superhero movie at last well made?

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  186. The Dark Horse news are good. What i fear is the price of the edition here in Spain. The publisher having the Dark Horse rights here is famous for his mugging disguised in the price tag.

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  187. The link to the radio station is a thing i'm deeply thankful for. I love radio! ;D Good one, of course.

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  188. I feel so healous. Being a pulp fan from Spain is hard sometimes. You have all this cons, the authors.. I have alot too, yes: Websites, podcasts.. a lot of stuff.

    But you can live things i can't. Still, i hope one day i can go to Pupfest and the people will look this strange spaniard guy who talks funny ;)

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  189. What a Sunday! First the Book Cave podcast for Pulpfest :D and after that, i learn about Operation Backpack

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